<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=948485148548743&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
COLLEGE IS CLOSED June 25th - due to a power outage
Quincy College Students: Please note that the June 8, 2018 application deadline has passed. Please contact Admissions for traditional transfer information. 

Nursing Curriculum

 

Associate in Science in Nursing

Professional Courses (37 credits)

NUR 1000: Nursing I Fundamental Health Concepts

9 credits
12 hours of clinical/laboratory and 5 hours of theory each week

This course is designed to provide the foundation of contemporary nursing practice for the entering student. The Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) serve as a framework and guiding principle for the design of competencies-based education and practice. Concepts basic to nursing practice and exemplars within the professional nursing role are introduced. The concepts are organized according to the domains of Health and Illness, Nursing, and Healthcare. Selected exemplars are used to support an understanding of the concepts. The following concepts are introduced: patient-centered care, professionalism, teamwork and collaboration, communication, informatics and technology, evidence-based practice, safety, quality improvement, leadership, system-based practice, and clinical judgment. Some concepts will define nursing care across the life span. Nutrition and principles of basic pharmacology are integrated. Opportunities are provided for students to learn, practice, and achieve basic-level competencies using concept-based skills in lab, simulation, and clinical setting. 

PREREQUISITES: ANA 1010
NUR 1020: Nursing II

10 credits
15 hours of clinical/simulated laboratory and 5 hours of theory each week

Nursing 1020 builds upon fundamental concepts acquired in NUR1000. Concepts based on the 3 domains of health & illness, nursing and healthcare, and the Massachusetts Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) continue as the theoretical framework. Concept Learning Modules introduce the learner to medical-surgical content, with an emphasis on health assessment of the adult client, discharge planning, ethical/legal principles and therapeutic communication. Pharmacology integration continues with the introduction of medical-surgical content. The integration of psychiatric/ mental health concepts focuses on cognition and grief.  Nursing skills are practiced in an acute medical-surgical setting. The learner is provided the opportunity to manage the care of one or more clients utilizing critical thinking skills and information seeking strategies to ensure evidence based practice.

PREREQUISITES: NUR 1000; ANA 1120
NUR 2000: Family Centered Nursing

8 credits
12 hours of clinical/ simulation laboratory and 4 hours of theory each week

Nursing 2000, introduces the learner to the nursing care of the childbearing woman, family, and the neonate through adolescence. Concepts based on the 3 domains of health & illness, nursing and healthcare, and the Massachusetts Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) continue as the theoretical framework.  The Concept Learning Modules introduce the learner to the specific needs of the childbearing woman, neonate, and child and nutrition and pharmacology continue as components within this course.  Clinical experiences are selected so that the student learns to communicate effectively with assigned clients and practices within the legal and ethical framework of nursing.

PREREQUISITES: NUR 1020, MIC2010 or MIC 2201
NUR 2020: Nursing III

10 Credits
15 hours of clinical/simulated laboratory and 5 hours of theory each week


Nursing 2020 is the final nursing course of the nursing program. Concepts based on the 3 domains of health & illness, nursing and healthcare, and Massachusetts Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) continue as the theoretical and conceptual framework.  This course will build upon previously acquired nursing knowledge, skills, and abilities, in order to integrate concepts of leadership and manager of care for multiple clients with complex health care needs. Psychiatric/mental health topics will focus on more complex psychiatric disorders and further development of therapeutic relationships with the client and family. Components of pharmacology and nutrition continue to be integrated in this course. Clinical learning experiences will take place in select acute care settings where students will perform the task of Team Leader to demonstrate the leadership and manager of care principles. This experience will include prioritizing care, delegation, and conflict resolution. In this course the learner will be encouraged to utilize more independent critical thinking and decision making skills in order to formulate nursing judgments in preparation for professional clinical practice. Contemporary issues and trends impacting the nursing profession will also be addressed. 

PREREQUISITES: NUR 2000
Beginning in Spring 2019, professional courses above will begin to transition to the following course numbers and titles. The below courses will completely replace the above courses by 2020. 
NUR 1015: Nursing I Fundamental Health Concepts (begins Spring 2019)

9 credits
12 hours of clinical/laboratory and 5 hours of theory each week

This course is designed to provide the foundation of contemporary nursing practice for the entering student. The Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) serve as a framework and guiding principle for the design of competencies-based education and practice. Concepts basic to nursing practice and exemplars within the professional nursing role are introduced. The concepts are organized according to the domains of Health and Illness, Nursing, and Healthcare. Selected exemplars are used to support an understanding of the concepts. The following concepts are introduced: patient-centered care, professionalism, teamwork and collaboration, communication, informatics and technology, evidence-based practice, safety, quality improvement, leadership, system-based practice, and clinical judgment. Some concepts will define nursing care across the life span. Nutrition and principles of basic pharmacology are integrated. Opportunities are provided for students to learn, practice, and achieve basic-level competencies using concept-based skills in lab, simulation, and clinical setting. 

PREREQUISITES: ANA 1010
NUR 1025: Health and Illness Concepts of the Adult and Child (begins Spring 2019)

9.5 credits
12 hours of clinical/simulated laboratory, 5 hours of classroom theory, and .5 hours of online theory each week

NUR1025 builds upon the Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) and concepts related to the domains of Health and Illness, Nursing and Healthcare previously introduced. Selected concepts with exemplars focus on the care of the adult and child. Health and Illness concepts are expanded to further develop clinical judgment when caring for the adult and child across the lifespan. Nutrition and principles of pharmacology are integrated. Opportunities are provided for students to learn, practice, and achieve competencies using concept-based skills in lab, simulation, and the clinical setting. The equivalent of 0.5 credit (7.5 hours) Pharmacological connections are included as an online component of this course.

PREREQUISITES: NUR 1000 or NUR 1015; ANA 1120
NUR 2005: Health and Illness Concepts of the Adult and Childbearing Family (begins Summer 2019)

9.5 credits
12 hours of clinical/ simulation laboratory, 5 hours of classroom theory, and .5 hours online theory each week

NUR2005 continues to build upon the Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies (NOFNCC) and concepts with more complex exemplars related to the domains of Health and Illness, Nursing and Healthcare previously introduced. Selected concepts with exemplars focus on the care of the adult and childbearing family. Health and Illness concepts are expanded to further apply clinical judgment when caring for the adult and childbearing family. Concepts will illustrate nursing care across the life span. Nutrition and principles of pharmacology are integrated. Opportunities are provided for students to learn, practice, and achieve competencies using conceptbased skills in lab, simulation, and the clinical setting. The equivalent of 0.5 credit (7.5 hours) Pharmacological connections are included as an online component of this course.

PREREQUISITES: NUR 1020 or NUR 1025, MIC 2010 or MIC 2201
NUR 2025: Advanced Health and Illness Concepts (begins Fall 2019)

9 credits
12 hours of clinical/simulated laboratory and 5 hours of classroom theory each week


NUR2025 focuses on the analysis and synthesis of complex concepts and exemplars associated with the domains of Health and Illness, Nursing and Healthcare acquired in previous nursing courses. A more in-depth understanding of nursing and healthcare concepts and exemplars focus on professionalism, teamwork and collaboration, communication, informatics and technology, evidence-based practice, safety, quality improvement, 112 leadership, system-based practice, and clinical judgment. Nutrition and more advanced principles of pharmacology are integrated. Opportunities are provided in simulation and the clinical setting, for students to achieve competency of more complex concept based skills. 

PREREQUISITES: NUR 2000 or NUR 2005
All general education courses must be completed prior to or concurrent with NUR 2025

General Education Courses (34 credits)

You may be eligible for transfer credit for some of the following general education courses; please refer to the Transfer Credit Policy for the Associate in Science in Nursing for details. 

ANA 1010: Anatomy & Physiology I

4 Credits
This course examines gross and microscopic anatomy, function, and inter-relationships of the body systems. Laboratory sessions emphasize basic physiologic principles as well as gross and microscopic mammalian anatomy. The expected outcome of the course is that students will have a working knowledge of the component parts of the body, from cells to organ systems. At the end of the course, students will be able to integrate this knowledge into an overall understanding of how the body functions in health and in disease states.

ANA 1120: Anatomy & Physiology II

4 Credits
This course continues the examination of gross and microscopic anatomy, function, and inter-relationships of the body systems. Laboratory sessions further emphasize basic physiologic principles as well as gross and microscopic mammalian anatomy. The expected outcome of the course is that students will have a working knowledge of the component parts of the body, from cells to organ systems. At the end of the course, students will be able to integrate this knowledge into an overall understanding of how the body functions in health and in disease states.
Prerequisite: ANA 1010

ETH 1010: Healthcare Ethics

3 credits
This course provides a critical academic exploration of healthcare ethics and seeks to foster a community of learners engaged in the pursuit of ethical knowledge. This pursuit embraces diversity and cross-cultural competency as it tries to envision a just society committed to the common good. As such this course seeks to answer the question, “What is the good life and human flourishing in relation to healthcare ethics?” The course proceeds in two parts: 1) introducing students to the normative ethical theories of consequentialism, deontology, virtue, human rights, theories of justice, and Catholic social ethics; and 2) applying these theories to the ethical domain of the health care professional. Special attention will be paid to the question of how advances of biotechnology and medicine benefit the most vulnerable members of society. Furthermore, this course aims to develop the critical thinking skills of students and help form them into ethical leaders within the healthcare professions.

HUM 1010: Introduction to Humanities

3 Credits
HUM 1010 is an introductory writing course that teaches students to compose college-level essays in response to readings in the arts and Humanities. With an emphasis on context, the course explores the connection between critical thinking and persuasive writing. By completing frequent writing assignments, students learn to craft written products that are clear, organized, coherent and persuasive.

INT 2100: Integrative Seminar

4 Credits
This course brings together insights from various modes of analysis (historical, social, economic, ethical, theological and aesthetical) to examine how the Civil Rights Movement brought the United States closer to the realization of a good and just society. This integrated approach acknowledges that human beings and human knowledge are holistic; that is, that the intellectual, physical, emotional, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions of humanity are all intimately connected. Therefore, any effort to analyze complex human behavior requires an integrative approach.

Prerequisites: All 1000 level general education courses or permission of Division Chair

PSY 1010: Introductory Psychology

3 credits
This course will present a broad array of topics studied in the field of psychology. Major theorists’ attempts to explain what makes human beings “tick” will be critiqued and the contradictions of their theories are highlighted. The interactions of the body and the psyche will be explored as well as motivation, sexuality, and abnormal behavior. Students will be required to participate in an interactive class, to look critically at the assumptions that underlie many theories in psychology, and to draw conclusions as to their validity. As one of the aims of the College is to prepare health professionals for evidence-based practice, research skills are introduced (or reinforced) in this course. Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts from a broad array of psychological fields; apply and analyze concepts studied; will use a variety of tools to locate current and reliable research data; evaluate the validity of data resources; and prioritize and synthesize research data to develop a theory and a hypothesis.

PSY 2010: Human Growth & Behavior
3 credits
This course provides a summary of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from birth to death. Major theorists in the field of human development are studied and critiqued and the contradictions of their theories are highlighted. The important tasks for each period of development are examined. Students also look closely at the inter-relationship between physical, cognitive, and psychological changes in each period of life. Students will be required to apply theoretical concepts to personal experience as part of the process of evaluating the validity of those concepts. As one of the aims of the College is to prepare health professionals for evidence-based practice, research skills are reinforced in this course.
MIC 2201: Microbiology for Healthcare Professionals

4 credits
Microbiology for Healthcare Professionals is oriented to the clinical needs of the healthcare professional. It provides students with an introduction to the microbe with an emphasis on the nature and behavior of microorganisms, the interrelationships between microbes and the human host in disease and health, and the principles of prevention and control of the infectious disease. Specific types of microbial infections of the respiratory, digestive, genitourinary, integumentary, nervous, cardiovascular, lymphatic, and sensory systems as well as the blood and wounds will be covered. Pathogenic review will include viruses, bacteria, prions, fungi, protozoa, and helminths as well as vectors. Also, special topics of antibiotic resistance, immunizations, wound infections, and bioterrorism will be included in content coverage.

Prerequisite: ANA 1010 and ANA 1120

HUM 2000: Humanities Elective

Choose 1 of 2 options below:

ENG 2050 World Literature

3 Credits 
World Literature introduces students to influential literary works from around the world. Students will consider the role of literature in shaping and responding to the ideology of both the time and place in which the text appears as well as the time and place in which we read the text. The course also examines the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production. Students learn to use different types of literary theory to contextualize their interpretations of these literary and cultural texts. Students demonstrate their understanding of the aesthetic works and critical concepts of the course by composing thesis-driven essays that analyze specific works of literature from a theoretical perspective. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1010

OR

ENG 2060 American Literature

3 Credits 
American Literature introduces students to influential literary works from the American Revolution to the present. Students will consider the role of literature in shaping and responding to the history and ideology of the United States. The course also examines the relationship between American literature and other forms of cultural production in the United States. Students learn to use different types of literary theory to contextualize their interpretations of these literary and cultural texts. Students demonstrate their understanding of the aesthetic works and critical concepts of the course by composing thesis-driven essays that analyze specific works of literature from a theoretical perspective.
Prerequisite: ENG 1010

THE 2000: Theology Elective

Choose 1 of 3 options below:

THE 2050: Religions of the World

3 Credits 
In an increasingly interconnected world, and especially in the religiously plural context of the United States, it is crucial that healthcare professionals become acquainted with the beliefs and practices of people from the diverse religious traditions that make up the American landscape. This course examines the world’s religious traditions and, in particular, the ways they conceptualize the person, health, and healing. Study of world religions can offer important and challenging insights into Western medicine. By the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts, beliefs, and practices of a variety of religious traditions; analyze primary sources drawn from religious traditions, such as sacred texts, images, ethical and dietary codes, first-person accounts, and the like; make comparisons between religious traditions based on evidence from primary sources; and use a variety of tools (online databases, journals, books, newspapers, web sites) to develop and research questions regarding the connection between a particular religious tradition and healthcare issues. Because one of the aims of the College is to prepare health professionals for evidence-based practice, research skills are reinforced in this class.

OR

THE 2070: Christianity

3 Credits 
Christianity is concerned primarily with the life, teaching, and historical setting of Jesus of Nazareth. This course also investigates the development of the New Testament and the subsequent development of the Christian faith, including the early Christian period, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, and Christianity in the New World. The Eastern and Western Churches and the Protestant tradition are examined. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the important religious and political themes at the time of Jesus, identify significant historical figures in the 59 Christian story, and comprehend the different elements which led to the development of the Christian faith within the Roman Empire. Critical-thinking skills and evidence-based practice are introduced and reinforced.

OR

THE 2090: Dying in the Human Life Cycle

3 Credits 
This course is a critical academic exploration of issues surrounding the human experience of death. The course examines the topic of death through information gathered from the medical, psychological, social/cultural, theological, and visual arts perspectives. These diverse approaches to the dying process will be analyzed as they pertain to what happens in the lives of patients, their families and friends, those who accompany the patients, and healthcare providers. Current issues and materials concerning the topic of death and dying will form the foundation for class discussion and reflection. As a course in theology, analysis of the dying process will be situated within the Catholic framework of emphasis on the inherent dignity of the human person. Special attention will be paid to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, 5th Edition, in order to explore ways human dignity flourishes and diminishes within the contemporary milieu as it pertains to end of life issues. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be afforded the opportunity to identify relevant concerns about the end of human life through informed personal reflection; develop and articulate an informed approach to death and dying as they impact healthcare delivery; and describe and evaluate the Roman Catholic Church’s moral stance on end-of-life issues.

Once you complete the Associate in Science in Nursing program, you  may sit for the NCLEX-RN examination to earn your RN credentials.

Following completion of the Associate in Science in Nursing, you may apply for the RN-BSN Program for completion of your Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree online. 

Want more information about this program?

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

RN-BSN Professional Courses

NUR 3110: Professional Nursing Perspectives

3 credits
This is an introductory bridge course for RN-BSN students. Core concepts of professional nursing practice are explored and analyzed within the framework of selected theories, trends, and issues of contemporary professional nursing practice.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program and current RN licensure.

NUR 3225: Pathophysiology

3 credits
This course explores the pathologies of the human body to altered states of health throughout the lifespan. Factors that influence health and illness, such as genomics, culture, and environment, are examined in relation to disease processes.

Prerequisite: For diploma RNs, completion of all 1000- and 2000-level science courses is required.

NUR 3330: Health Assessment

3 credits
The Health Assessment course is designed to provide the RN student with the knowledge and skills to perform a comprehensive health assessment. This course will expand upon prior knowledge of health assessment and will address cultural, developmental, psychosocial, environmental and societal factors inherent in promoting health across the lifespan. Techniques of data collection and documentation will be expanded upon to enhance critical thinking skills. This course will then shift the paradigm focus from the individual to the community with a focus on prevention and early detection of disease. Students will be introduced to the health care needs of diverse and vulnerable populations.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program.

NUR 3445: Communications and Informatics in Healthcare

3 credits
Interdisciplinary communication within the present-day healthcare arena encompasses many forms. The professional Nurse as an effective communicator has to be able to deliver clear and concise communication, which is essential to safe patient care. This course will examine the role and impact that effective communication skills have on patient care outcomes and in clinical practice. In addition, communication and informatics as they relate to professional Nursing will be explored. The concepts and skills of communication, informatics, and information literacy will be presented.

NUR 3660: Evidence-Based Nursing Practice

3 credits
This course provides a basic understanding of the research process and its application to Nursing practice. Components of both quantitative and qualitative research techniques and ethical conduct required of Nurse researchers are explored.

Prerequisite: MAT 3410

NUR 4225: Leadership and Management in Healthcare

4 credits
This course will explore key organizational structures and operation of healthcare within the United States with a focus on quality of healthcare and error reduction. This course will provide an overview of the functions of leadership and management within a changing healthcare environment. Emphasis will be placed on current issues that affect leadership and management in the practice setting. The science of management and the integration of leadership principles are explored within the context of clinical microsystems. Students are required to attend one Nursing organization meeting that will be approved by the professor.

Prerequisite: All 3000-level Nursing courses, unless authorized by the Chairperson of the Nursing program.

NUR 4230: Foundations in Community/Public Health Nursing

3 credits
This course provides an overview of the field of community/public health nursing in assessing the healthcare needs of aggregates and communities. This course explores the physical, economic, societal and environmental factors that affect public health. Selected extramural activities augment the theoretical aspects of the course in relation to multidisciplinary collaboration and coordination of care in the community.

Prerequisite: All 3000-level Nursing courses, unless authorized by the Chairperson of the Nursing program.

NUR 4335: Application of Evidence-Based Practice and Practicum

6 credits
This course and practicum offers the student the opportunity to identify a substantive, research problem related to improving patient outcomes in a healthcare setting, and will assist the student to synthesize concepts and knowledge learned in the RN-BSN program. The student will work in conjunction with a mentor to identify a research problem related to the mentorship experience. The previous Nursing research course serves as the foundation for implementing the principles of evidence-based practice. The student will begin to develop the first three phases on an evidence-based proposal. This course involves six hours per week of clinical time; this time is flexible to maximize the student learning by allowing practical application of theory and principles in a practice setting. Consideration is given to the student’s career objectives whether they are related to service, education, or administration. Mentorship: Six hours per week working with mentor. Students need to complete a total of 72 mentorship hours. Students are required to attend one legislative or executive branch meeting/ hearing at the State House and/or MA Board of Registration in Nursing meeting. This meeting is to be included as part of the student’s mentorship hours.

Prerequisite: All 3000- 4000-level nursing courses.

SES 4350: Senior Capstone

3 credits
The Senior Capstone demands reflection, insight, and synthesis. This is an interdisciplinary course taught by both a General Education professor and a Nursing professor. This teaching team will assist the student to investigate, demonstrate, and synthesize course and program learning for problem solving and applications of undergraduate coursework across the entire curriculum. This course synthesizes concepts throughout the disciplines to create a unified framework for developing pathways for understanding the value, applications, and transferable use of the cumulative study at Labouré College. Students demonstrate collective competencies; pedagogical, practical, and personal advancement for the benefit of self and others; personal and professional growth that reflect cognitive and emotional intelligence; and knowledge and understanding of lifespan challenges and choices. Future contexts of professional growth are considered. Students will complete a professional portfolio to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes from the RN-to-BSN curriculum.

Prerequisite: All 4000- level general education courses.

RN-BSN General Education Courses

MAT 3410: Essentials of Statistics

3 credits
This course introduces the various methods used to collect, organize, summarize, interpret and reach conclusions about data. An emphasis is placed on demonstrating that statistics is more than mathematical calculations. By using examples gathered from real life, students learn to use statistical methods as analytical tools to develop generalizations and meaningful conclusions in their field of study.

ETH 3000: Ethics Elective

Choose one (1) of the following courses: 

ETH 3210: Ethical Domains and Dilemmas

3 credits
This course compares and contrasts views of human nature that underlie social, business, and personal ethical dilemmas. Catholic philosophical perspectives are explored as they relate to the formation of human agents and the performance of human actions. Course readings are analyzed and evaluated for meaning, implications, and consequences of views of human nature as they impact theories of ethics within a sampling of historical turning points. Case studies, selections, and accounts of major contributions to human knowledge and understanding are analyzed from the perspectives of varied schools of ethics. Cultural relativism, utilitarianism, deontological ethics, virtue theory and contemporary theories of justice, among other schools of thought, are studied within contexts, categories of understanding or domains, and themes of human nature.

OR

THE 3010: Religion, Medicine, and Ethics

3 credits
This course offers an interdisciplinary analysis of the intersections of Religion, Medicine, and Ethics. In particular, it will offer an alternative to the Western trend to bifurcate spiritual care from physical care. As Max Weber pointed out a century ago, modern society treats the human being as a substance to be manipulated and controlled. The current technocratic paradigm views healthcare as merely the application of the latest scientific knowledge and technique without concern for the spiritual nature of the human being. In juxtaposition to this current trend, this course will explore how illness, health and healing are religious experiences requiring analysis through a theological-ethical paradigm. We will demonstrate the need for a complementary understanding of the roles of medicine and religion in order to incorporate holistic care into more clinical settings. Specifically, this course will highlight the importance of integrating a holistic approach to health and wellbeing that addresses the physical, spiritual, social and emotional dimensions of the patient. Lastly, this course will examine how health and wellbeing were constitutive elements of the Christian faith and the need to recover religious practices aimed at restoring holistic wellbeing.

HUM 3010: Critical Analysis

3 credits
This course focuses on the skills and concepts needed to develop reading and listening habits necessary for critical thinking. The course emphasizes thinking skills: comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in order to develop inter-related questions, which serve as the direction toward better opinions and decisions. Current topics from a variety of sources will provide the basis for analysis and application of skills. Students synthesize learning to present their own positions and arguments.

SSC 3000: Social Science Elective

Choose one (1) of the following courses: 

SSC 3310: Intercultural Communications

3 credits
This course explores different forms of communication in contexts of varied backgrounds, experiences, ideas, and styles of expression. Contemporary viewpoints are situated in historical perspective. Students identify, compare, contrast, and critique communication behaviors within and among cultures. Readings and discussions stress a positive appreciation of commonalities and differences between individuals and groups, locally and globally.

OR

SSC 3020: Psychological, Social, and Physiological Effects of Trauma

3 credits
Trauma is a ubiquitous experience that can take many forms – acute, persistent, physical, psychological, collective, and/or individual to name a few. While the experience of trauma may be universal, each person’s response to trauma is unique. The manner in which one responds to trauma also has profound implications for physical and mental health. It is, therefore, critical that healthcare providers have a thorough understanding of the effects of trauma and trauma-informed care. This course provides with a thorough grounding in the psychological, social and physiological effects of trauma and how to care for individuals with trauma-related illnesses. The effects of trauma and trauma-informed care will be examined from the perspective of the patient as well as the healthcare professional. Students will learn healthy professional and personal responses to their own trauma and how this impacts their patients. This focus will increase awareness, provide understanding and assist students in developing a personal skill set supportive to all aspects of trauma response.

SCI 4000: Natural Science Elective

Choose one (1) of the following courses: 

SCI 4010: Scientific Revolutions

3 credits
This course outlines several major scientific advances through history. The impact of those advances on the scientific field and on the broader society is highlighted. The nature of scientific change—from the scientific method of empirical observation to the paradigm shifts of scientific revolution—will be examined. By the end of the course, students will have a broad understanding of major advances in several different scientific fields and the human components that are part of bringing those advances forward.

OR

SCI 4020: Biology of Cancer

3 credits
This course explores the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer and its effects on individuals and society. In particular, it provides students with a basic understanding of the nature of cancer and the genetic, molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to cancer. It also includes a survey of the fundamental principles behind cancer diagnosis, prevention, and therapeutic intervention, including risk factors for the major forms of cancers and how they vary according to gender, ethnicity, culture, and socioeconomic status. While based primarily on content from the life sciences, SCI 4020 incorporates insights from the fields of Sociology, Psychology, History and Economics.

INT 4010: Agents of Social Change - Advanced Integrative Seminar

3 credits
This course focuses on the topic of social change and a means of providing students with opportunities to integrate what they have learned in discipline specific and multidisciplinary courses in the liberal arts and sciences. It uses on inter-disciplinary approach to examine the context of American social justice movements through a variety of cultural "texts," including scholarly, press, primary sources, and other popular sources. Students will be asked to consider different theories of historical change and determine how they both inform and are informed by the movements under examination. They will also be asked to reflect upon the key components of successful social change movements and how they differ from failed attempts at change. To demonstrate mastery of course objectives, students will be required to research and design a small-scale change movement of relevance to their lives.