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COLLEGE IS CLOSED June 25th - due to a power outage
Quincy College Students: Please note that the June 8, 2018 application deadline has passed. Please contact Admissions for traditional transfer information. 

Radiation Therapy Curriculum

As a radiation therapy student, you will study the principles of radiation and how they are applied to developing a treatment plan for patients. You will also study related medical fields such a pathology (the study of disease), oncology (the study of cancer), and radiobiology (how cells react to treatment). Radiation physics and mathematics used in treatment planning are also part of the program, as are techniques of diagnostic radiology. Because patient contact is a large part of radiation therapy practice, our program includes the study of ethics and emotional and psychological issues in the field. 

Professional Courses

RTT 1100: Introduction to RTT and Medical Terminology

2.5 credits 
This course is an introductory overview of radiation therapy, including its practices and affiliations. The course provides an examination of the therapist role within the interdisciplinary healthcare system with an emphasis on professionalism, professional societies, communication, and medical terminology. There is an examination of the theory and application of the law in relation to the healthcare system. At the conclusion of this course, the student will identify radiation therapy equipment and its basic function; analyze the psychological and psychosocial issues cancer patients experience; communicate with patients and healthcare providers using the correct medical terminology; and define the role of a radiation therapist as part of a team within the Radiation Oncology Department and healthcare system.
Requisite: ANA 1010 (prior to or concurrent with course)

RTT 114C: RA - Clinical Education I

2.5 credits 
This clinical experience requires active participation in the clinical setting with development of the skills and knowledge necessary to deliver accurately the planning course or radiation therapy with the supervision of the clinical supervisor. At the conclusion of this course, the student will meet clinical requirements as stated in the Radiation Therapy Handbook.
Requisite: ANA 1010 (prior to or concurrent with course)

RTT 1110: Treatment Techniques

1.5 credits
This course provides an examination of the theory and application of treatment techniques within the field of radiation therapy. Strong emphasis on the bony anatomy of the body and how it relates to the simulation and treatment of patients, along with the introduction of cross-sectional anatomy. At the conclusion of this course, the student will identify bones of radiograph’s anatomy and anatomy within cross-sectional films; recite typical treatment techniques for specific areas of the body; narrate immobilization devices, typical doses and fractionation schemes, critical structures, blocking and boost methods, side effects and their treatment; and routes of spread and specific body landmarks as they relate to simulation and treatment setup.
Requisite: ANA 1010 (prior to or concurrent with course)

RTT 1170: Applied Mathematics and Basic Physics

1 credit 
This course provides instruction, review, practice and evaluation in mathematics skills specifically relevant to radiation therapy technology and the operation of a scientific calculator. Basic concepts of physics that are needed in preparation for subsequent radiation physics courses are explored, learned, and developed. At the conclusion of this course, the student will perform basic arithmetic operations and use negative numbers; formulate and evaluate ratios; translate verbal statement into algebraic expressions; solve simple linear equations; linearly interpolate; describe the nature of graphs of exponential expressions; analyze and state the fundamental qualities of physics; state nuclear structure; and explain electromagnetic radiation and the duel nature of the photon.
Requisite: ANA 1010 (prior to or concurrent with course)

RTT 1200: Introduction to Patient Care

2.5 credits 
This course provides a comprehensive exploration of patient care techniques, including detection and prevention, blood values, patient assessment, nutrition, skin care regiments, infection control, and support services. It also offers an explanation of radiological and digital imaging related to radiation therapy and identification of body landmarks when simulating and treating radiation oncology patients. There is also an investigation of diagnostic technologies and their use in radiation therapy. At the conclusion of this course, the student will perform aseptic technique; be knowledgeable of contrast media and contraindications; recognize normal and abnormal vital signs; recite normal and abnormal ranges of blood values in patient receiving radiation therapy; be able to evaluate a patient’s nutritional status and make recommendations; and demonstrate radiology concepts, including exposure factors, imaging quality, and film processing.
Requisite: ANA 1120 (prior to or concurrent with course)
Prerequisites: ANA 1010, RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170

RTT 124C: RA - Clinical Education II

2.5 credits 
This clinical experience encourages active participation in the clinical setting with development of the skills and knowledge necessary to deliver accurately the planning course of radiation therapy with the supervision of the clinical supervisor. At the conclusion of this course, the student will meet clinical requirements as stated in the Radiation Therapy Handbook.
Requisite: ANA 1120 (prior to or concurrent with course)
Prerequisite: ANA 1010, ANA 1120, RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1170

RTT 1270: Principles of Math and Physics

3 credits 
This course offers a review of physical units, measurements, principles, atomic structure, and types of radiation. There is also an introduction to the fundamentals of x-ray generating equipment, x-ray production and its interaction with matter as well as the basic comprehension of the physics pertinent to developing an awareness of radiations used in the clinical setting. At the conclusion of this course, the student will compare the characteristics and functions of a proton, neutron, and electron; describe the process of ionization; differentiate between the radiation of the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum; identify the components on a schematic resistance circuit diagram; apply Ohm’s Law and power formulas to determine power consumed; list the characteristics and functions of a cathode and rotating anode; identify parts of an x-ray tube and a complete x-ray circuit; state the principles of x-ray production; and define photodisintegration.
Requisite: ANA 1120 (prior to or concurrent with course)
Prerequisites: ANA 1010, RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170

RTT 2100: Introductory Pathophysiology and Radiobiology

RTT 2100 Introductory Pathology and Radiobiology

3 credits 
This course provides an investigation into the effects of radiation therapy on a molecular cellular and tissue level with explanation and examples of radiosensitivity and late somatic effects of radiation. It also provides a summary of the disease process and pathology with emphasis on hyperplasia, neoplasms, and cancer. At the conclusion of this course, the student will identify acute and late effects of radiation therapy; recite radiobiological interactions; recognize structural changes in tissues following radiation; explain total body radiation response; identify cell composition, structure, and division; recite the fundamentals of pathology and the measure of disease frequency; classify disease diagnosis and responses to injury; and distinguish and identify hyperplasia, neoplasms and cancer.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P

RTT 214C: RA - Clinical Education III

2.5 credits 
This clinical experience provides for active participation in the clinical setting with development of the skills and knowledge necessary to deliver accurately the planning course or radiation therapy with the supervision of the clinical supervisor. At the conclusion of this course, the student will meet clinical requirements as stated in the Radiation Therapy Handbook.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P

RTT 2170: Radiation Physics I

3 credits 
This course offers a review and expansion of theories and concepts introduced in RTT 1270. It provides an analysis of the structure of matter, properties of radiation, nuclear transformations, x-ray production, and interactions of ionizing radiation. Explored also is the differentiation of specific radiation therapy treatment units and photon and electron beam dosimetry related to the treatment of patients. At the conclusion of this course, the student will compare and contrast atomic structure and composition of elements, atomic number and mass number; compare isotope, isotone, isobar and isomer; categorize the four fundamental forces of nature; describe the processes of ionization and excitation; define and compare radioactivity, decay, constant, activity and half-life; calculate rate of decay, change in activity, average life, and attenuation requirements for a given isotope; define fission and fusion; describe x-ray production and all components of a linear accelerator; define and describe all Cobol 60 elements; calculate half value layer; discuss the purpose and importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology; choose the appropriate radiation detector for given clinical applications; participate in external beam calibration; and describe the quality of a gamma-ray beam.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P

RTT 2200: Radiation Oncology

3 credits 
Building upon knowledge obtained from previous courses, this course examines and evaluates the management of neoplastic disease. Epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, treatment options, histology, classifications, grading, and patterns of spread will be explored for each neoplastic disease. Presentation of weekly case studies to evaluate and analyze the course of treatment, potential side effects, and prognosis will be compared and contrasted to published tumor site-specific information. At the conclusion of this course, the student will analyze the rationale for treatment decisions; discuss and compare the characteristics of each neoplastic site; describe etiology, signs, and symptoms and diagnostic tests associated with sitespecific tumors; analyze staging, grading, and routes of spread of common neoplastic diseases; differentiate the characteristics of benign versus malignant neoplasms; and define screening procedures and prevention programs.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P, RTT 2100, RTT 214C, RTT 2170

RTT 224C: RA - Clinical Education IV

3.5 credits 
This clinical experience provides for active participation in the clinical setting with development of the skills and knowledge necessary to deliver accurately the planning course or radiation therapy with the supervision of the clinical supervisor. At the conclusion of this course, the student will meet clinical requirements as stated in the Radiation Therapy Handbook.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P, RTT 2100, RTT 214C, RTT 2170

RTT 2270: Radiation Physics II

3 credits 
This course emphasizes the principles of clinical application in treatment planning, brachytherapy, and quality assurance. Isodose descriptions, patient contouring, radiobiological considerations, dosimetric calculations, compensation and clinical application of treatment beams are examined along with stereotactic and emerging technologies. At the conclusion of this course, the student will compare photon and electron Isodose curves; determine factors that influence beam distribution; identify organs and tissues at risk and their dose limitations; compare fractionation schemes; apply appropriate factors for manual treatment calculations; perform dose calculations for external photon and electron beam treatments; explain algorithms incorporate into treatment planning computers; evaluate treatment plans for clinical use; examine hot and cold regions associated with various matching methods; describe the International Commission of Radiological Units recommendations; describe the physical characteristics of an electron beam; describe how inhomgeneities influence beam path; analyze shielding materials and uses; determine clinical usefulness of various beam types and the clinical implications; describe clinical implications of radiosurgery and discuss the procedure and equipment used; describe configurations, considerations and differences of multileaf collimators; compare low dose rate to high dose rate brachytherapy; summarize components of brachytherapy; state radiation safety requirements for brachytherapy; and identify and describe the process and applications for using IMRT.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P, RTT 2100, RTT 214C, RTT 2170

RTT 2290: Seminar Radiation Therapy

1.5 credits 
The seminar provides for an examination of selected readings, discussions, and projects in the field of radiation therapy. It also offers a comprehensive physics/dosimetry review for preparation of the radiation therapy board examination. At the conclusion of this course, the student will prepare a detailed project on a selected radiation therapy topic; participate in mock board registry examinations; compute calculations performed in a radiation therapy department (e.g., GAP calculation, MU calculation, and extended distance calculation); analyze CT and MRI radiographs and identify structures; and summarize and recite radiation protection quality assurance statistics.
Prerequisites: RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P, RTT 2100, RTT 214C, RTT 2170

RTT 100P: RA - Clinical Practicum I

5.5 credits 
This clinical experience provides an opportunity to demonstrate proficiency in applying learned techniques and applications in the treatment of radiation oncology patients. It also offers experience in the physics division with emphasis on imaging and treatment planning and integration into the team approach to radiation therapy. At the conclusion of this course, the student will meet clinical requirements as stated in the Radiation Therapy Handbook.
Prerequisites: ANA 1010, ANA 1120, RTT 1100, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270

RTT 200P: RA - Clinical Practicum II

2.5 credits 
In a clinical setting, the student will demonstrate proficiency in applying learned techniques and application in the treatment of radiation oncology patients. The clinical will provide experience in the physics division, with emphasis on imaging and treatment planning and integration into the team approach of radiation therapy. At the conclusion of this course, the student will meet clinical requirements as stated in the Radiation Therapy Handbook.
Prerequisites: RTT 110, RTT 114C, RTT 1110, RTT 1170, RTT 1200, RTT 124C, RTT 1270, RTT 100P, RTT 2100, RTT 214C, RTT 2170, RTT 2200, RTT 224C, RTT 2270

General Education Courses

You may be eligible for transfer credit for some of the following general education courses; please refer to the Transfer Credit Policy for the Associate in Science in Radiation Therapy for details. 

ANA 1010: Anatomy & Physiology I
4 Credits
This course examines gross and microscopic anatomy, function, and inter-relationships of the body systems. Laboratory sessions emphasize basic physiologic principles as well as gross and microscopic mammalian anatomy. The expected outcome of the course is that students will have a working knowledge of the component parts of the body, from cells to organ systems. At the end of the course, students will be able to integrate this knowledge into an overall understanding of how the body functions in health and in disease states.
ANA 1120 Anatomy and Physiology II
4 Credits
This course continues the examination of gross and microscopic anatomy, function, and inter-relationships of the body systems. Laboratory sessions further emphasize basic physiologic principles as well as gross and microscopic mammalian anatomy. The expected outcome of the course is that students will have a working knowledge of the component parts of the body, from cells to organ systems. At the end of the course, students will be able to integrate this knowledge into an overall understanding of how the body functions in health and in disease states.
Prerequisite: ANA 1010
HUM 1010: Introduction to Humanities
3 Credits

HUM 1010 is an introductory writing course that teaches students to compose college-level essays in response to readings in the arts and Humanities. With an emphasis on context, the course explores the connection between critical thinking and persuasive writing. By completing frequent writing assignments, students learn to craft written products that are clear, organized, coherent and persuasive.

ETH 1010: Healthcare Ethics

3 credits
This course provides a critical academic exploration of healthcare ethics and seeks to foster a community of learners engaged in the pursuit of ethical knowledge. This pursuit embraces diversity and cross-cultural competency as it tries to envision a just society committed to the common good. As such this course seeks to answer the question, “What is the good life and human flourishing in relation to healthcare ethics?” The course proceeds in two parts: 1) introducing students to the normative ethical theories of consequentialism, deontology, virtue, human rights, theories of justice, and Catholic social ethics; and 2) applying these theories to the ethical domain of the health care professional. Special attention will be paid to the question of how advances of biotechnology and medicine benefit the most vulnerable members of society. Furthermore, this course aims to develop the critical thinking skills of students and help form them into ethical leaders within the healthcare professions.

PSY 1010: Introductory Psychology
3 credits
This course will present a broad array of topics studied in the field of psychology. Major theorists’ attempts to explain what makes human beings “tick” will be critiqued and the contradictions of their theories are highlighted. The interactions of the body and the psyche will be explored as well as motivation, sexuality, and abnormal behavior. Students will be required to participate in an interactive class, to look critically at the assumptions that underlie many theories in psychology, and to draw conclusions as to their validity. As one of the aims of the College is to prepare health professionals for evidence-based practice, research skills are introduced (or reinforced) in this course. Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts from a broad array of psychological fields; apply and analyze concepts studied; will use a variety of tools to locate current and reliable research data; evaluate the validity of data resources; and prioritize and synthesize research data to develop a theory and a hypothesis.
INT 2100: Integrative Seminar

4 Credits
This course brings together insights from various modes of analysis (historical, social, economic, ethical, theological and aesthetical) to examine how the Civil Rights Movement brought the United States closer to the realization of a good and just society. This integrated approach acknowledges that human beings and human knowledge are holistic; that is, that the intellectual, physical, emotional, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions of humanity are all intimately connected. Therefore, any effort to analyze complex human behavior requires an integrative approach.

Prerequisites: All 1000 level general education courses or permission of Division Chair

HUM 2000: Humanities Elective

Choose 1 of 2 options below:

ENG 2050 World Literature

3 Credits 
World Literature introduces students to influential literary works from around the world. Students will consider the role of literature in shaping and responding to the ideology of both the time and place in which the text appears as well as the time and place in which we read the text. The course also examines the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production. Students learn to use different types of literary theory to contextualize their interpretations of these literary and cultural texts. Students demonstrate their understanding of the aesthetic works and critical concepts of the course by composing thesis-driven essays that analyze specific works of literature from a theoretical perspective. 
Prerequisite: ENG 1010

OR

ENG 2060 American Literature

3 Credits 
American Literature introduces students to influential literary works from the American Revolution to the present. Students will consider the role of literature in shaping and responding to the history and ideology of the United States. The course also examines the relationship between American literature and other forms of cultural production in the United States. Students learn to use different types of literary theory to contextualize their interpretations of these literary and cultural texts. Students demonstrate their understanding of the aesthetic works and critical concepts of the course by composing thesis-driven essays that analyze specific works of literature from a theoretical perspective.
Prerequisite: ENG 1010

 

THE 2000: Theology Elective

Choose 1 of 3 options below:

THE 2050: Religions of the World

3 Credits 
In an increasingly interconnected world, and especially in the religiously plural context of the United States, it is crucial that healthcare professionals become acquainted with the beliefs and practices of people from the diverse religious traditions that make up the American landscape. This course examines the world’s religious traditions and, in particular, the ways they conceptualize the person, health, and healing. Study of world religions can offer important and challenging insights into Western medicine. By the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts, beliefs, and practices of a variety of religious traditions; analyze primary sources drawn from religious traditions, such as sacred texts, images, ethical and dietary codes, first-person accounts, and the like; make comparisons between religious traditions based on evidence from primary sources; and use a variety of tools (online databases, journals, books, newspapers, web sites) to develop and research questions regarding the connection between a particular religious tradition and healthcare issues. Because one of the aims of the College is to prepare health professionals for evidence-based practice, research skills are reinforced in this class.

OR

THE 2070: Christianity

3 Credits 
Christianity is concerned primarily with the life, teaching, and historical setting of Jesus of Nazareth. This course also investigates the development of the New Testament and the subsequent development of the Christian faith, including the early Christian period, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, and Christianity in the New World. The Eastern and Western Churches and the Protestant tradition are examined. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to describe the important religious and political themes at the time of Jesus, identify significant historical figures in the 59 Christian story, and comprehend the different elements which led to the development of the Christian faith within the Roman Empire. Critical-thinking skills and evidence-based practice are introduced and reinforced.

OR

THE 2090: Dying in the Human Life Cycle

3 Credits 
This course is a critical academic exploration of issues surrounding the human experience of death. The course examines the topic of death through information gathered from the medical, psychological, social/cultural, theological, and visual arts perspectives. These diverse approaches to the dying process will be analyzed as they pertain to what happens in the lives of patients, their families and friends, those who accompany the patients, and healthcare providers. Current issues and materials concerning the topic of death and dying will form the foundation for class discussion and reflection. As a course in theology, analysis of the dying process will be situated within the Catholic framework of emphasis on the inherent dignity of the human person. Special attention will be paid to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, 5th Edition, in order to explore ways human dignity flourishes and diminishes within the contemporary milieu as it pertains to end of life issues. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be afforded the opportunity to identify relevant concerns about the end of human life through informed personal reflection; develop and articulate an informed approach to death and dying as they impact healthcare delivery; and describe and evaluate the Roman Catholic Church’s moral stance on end-of-life issues.

Total Program Credits: 70 

Students may choose to take three or more years to complete this program based on work schedules or family responsibilities. With this option, general education courses are taken before the professional course sequence.

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